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Thursday, 23 June 2016

Rehabilitating The Lazy Girl

Cilla Said
In the course of setting up this blog, I’ve been doing a lot of research (read googling) around the topic of The Lazy Girl. As you’re no doubt aware; I’m not the first person to make use of the phrase. The Lazy Girl has been strutting around the internet for a while now – go take a look and you’ll find countless blog posts, articles and meme’s offering to help make your life magical, for minimal effort.

But, as Casey Johnston rightly points out in her article for The Cut: That Lazy Girl is a lie.

The Lazy Girl as we know her is the cool kid, the effortlessly beautiful manic pixie girl who can eat as much pizza as she likes, transform her old my little pony pyjamas into a viral fashion statement and has someone on hand at all times for an impromptu Instagram photoshoot (that she’s nonchalantly oblivious to).

The Lazy Girl is the original social media queen. She knows how to play it, and she knows how to fake it. She’s the girl who gets up at 4AM in order to get her au natural make up perfectly on point, and ensure her signature tousled bed head has just the right amount of body.

She doesn’t exist IRL and there’s a deep hypocrisy in pairing such an unachievable lifestyle with The Lazy Girl. What The Lazy Girl meme really stands for is the need to look like we don’t care, the need to look like life is easy breezy and most importantly? The desire to be cool – and, as we all know, ain’t nothing cooler than not caring (unless really, you do).

My problem with this is the pressure it puts on women; pressure which, in my opinion, stinks of the patriarchy. The Lazy Girl in her current form is the poster girl for everything you are not, and everything you think you should be; as laid out by society.

Johnston puts this down as a backlash response to the busy woman; modern women juggling career, household and children in a never before seen plate dance of danger. In some ways I agree with Johnston, for me the chance to redefine what I want from life and slow things down came out of my own need to get out of the rat race…but there’s nothing elegantly effortless here.

Too much pizza and I’ll gain weight, au naturel signals extra time in bed whilst I skip the dull monotony of my makeup routine (which incidentally, is also truly lazy), I don’t play well with having my photograph taken and my Instagram consists mainly of coffee, cake and cats. My weekends are spent with friends, family and Netflix and I stopped dying my hair alternative colours (or any colours) the day I left university. I don’t have an infinity symbol on my wrist, and I go to Starbucks for the coffee, not the free wifi, I’ve never ordered from the special menu and have subsequently never bragged about it on Instagram.

So, if that’s how a real lazy girl lives her life - how the fuck did she become the mythical creature of meme we know today? Who decided it was in their power to change the definition of the word lazy, when applied to women? Perhaps, it’s down to the negative connotations usually associated with the word or maybe, as I suspect, it’s just another way to keep us busy with our hair and makeup.
Either way, it’s time we rehabilitated The Lazy Girl. So stick with me, and hopefully we can do just that.

This blog aims to show you how to use lazy girl life hacks to your advantage, yes – but it also aims to show you that being a real lazy girl is fine; going out with no makeup on is fine, not brushing your hair in a week is (in my curly haired opinion) A-Okay and vowing never to pick up an iron again is a perfectly acceptable life choice.

I want to talk about the real Lazy Girl; who hasn’t seen a matching pair of socks for weeks, eats noodles for dinner nightly and has a personal relationship with her Just Eat delivery drivers.


I want to rehabilitate The Lazy Girl and the #LAZYLIFE; too often we are made to feel we should be doing more, aiming higher, climbing the ladder, adding another layer of mascara. Some people love the daily grind; they feed off it and it energises them, but if that’s not you – please know that there is nothing wrong with bowing out. In fact, it could be everything you’ve ever needed.  

Cilla Said / Author & Editor

I’m a 25-year-old freelance writer, I studied English Literature in London and have an incessant love for all things fictional, I currently live in Manchester with my partner; Nathan, and our growing menagerie of household pets.

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